Kiss me like I paid for this.

Nikki / 21 / California
Scorpio Sun
Libra Moon
Gemini Rising

astrologyexplained:

astrologyexplained:

Libra (left) and Scorpio (right) best friends.

astrologyexplained:

astrologyexplained:

Libra (left) and Scorpio (right) best friends.

odaze:

bled:

'and then i realised adventure was the best way to learn' I'm not sure who wrote this though, it didn't come with a signature or name anywhere around it


guess I’ll be stupid forever cus I never adventure

odaze:

bled:

'and then i realised adventure was the best way to learn' I'm not sure who wrote this though, it didn't come with a signature or name anywhere around it

guess I’ll be stupid forever cus I never adventure

(Source: vein)

yatzer:

This enchanting photograph was taken in 1995 by renowned French photographer François Halard during his visit to the landmark Palm Springs home of architect Alfred Frey.

yatzer:

This enchanting photograph was taken in 1995 by renowned French photographer François Halard during his visit to the landmark Palm Springs home of architect Alfred Frey.

(via odaze)

cnnbreakingofficial:

omg mom it’s JUST METH calm down

(Source: 911official, via odaze)

(Source: gay4zaynmalik, via naominicholson)

barahkat:

themaidenofthetree:

I want you to imagine a ten year old version of yourself sitting right there on this couch. Now this is the little girl who first believed that she was fat, and ugly, and an embarrassment.

This scene effected me so much

(via eames-i-am-impressed)

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:



Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.
One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.
First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.
There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

chazzfox:

cijithegeek:

kyssthis16:

yeezysdisciple:

youngbertreynolds:

thempress:

image

Maybe put it on a canvas instead of someone’s property, and we can all be happy.

who paying for these canvases or the art programs so these kids can have that? Why should it matter if these run down buildings that never get fixed up anyway get graffiti’d? 

Therein lies the issue. Art programs, both visual and performance based, are the first programs to be cut. Canvas ain’t cheap. Neither are the supplies. Much of the graffiti that takes place IS on buildings that are run down. The gov’t didn’t place any value on these properties and yet get pissy with dudes “vandalizing” their shit. You can’t have it both ways, ya dig. 

My father was a garment contractor in LA. In the late 80s, he owned the building where he had his factory. He thought it would be a cool idea to commission local graffiti artists, usually young Black and Latino men looking to stay out of trouble, to paint murals on his buildings. After all, he runs a garment design/manufacturing company, and creative signage is great advertising.

One day, he showed up to the building and the city just painted over the murals without permission or notice.

First, the city told him he couldn’t have graffiti art on HIS building because it brought down property value. After he complained, then they said: ok you can do this, but you need a permit. After he got the permit, then the city said: ok, but you can only use these artists.  Of course, these artists were all White graphic design students from USC, and of course they charged 3x more.

There is a prejudice against this type of art, and it’s racial.  Banksy vandalizes folks buildings all the time, and folks treat him like the Messiah. He ain’t doing nothing new that Black and Brown folks haven’t done for decades.

This whole post…I just find it really interesting! And sad, too, but good thing to read.

(Source: vandalslife, via eames-i-am-impressed)

wetheurban:

SPOTLIGHT: Tiny Tattoos by Austin Tott 

This awesome photo series titled ‘Tiny Tattoos’ by Austin Tott, a photographer based in Seattle, Washington, revolves around just that. More after the jump:

Read More

(via cats-can)

superbnature:

Spiderweb and Trees by Photonoodle

superbnature:

Spiderweb and Trees by Photonoodle

(via wild-nirvana)